Jan30

January 30, 2016 (Saturday)

St. Martina of Rome

Saturday of the Third Week
GREEN

2 Sm 12:1-7a, 10-17

Ps 51

Mk 4:35-41

 

THE CALMING OF A STORM AT SEA

35On that day, as evening drew on, Jesus said to his disciples: “Let us cross to the other side.” 36Leaving the crowd, they took him with them in the boat just as he was. And other boats were with him. 37A violent squall came up and waves were breaking over the boat, so that it was already lling up. 38Jesus was in the stern, asleep on a cushion.They woke him and said to him, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?” 39He woke up, rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, “Quiet! Be still!” The wind ceased and there was great calm. 40Then he asked them, “Why are you terri ed? Do you not yet have faith?” 41They were lled with great awe and said to one another,“Who then is this whom even wind and sea obey?”

WHO THEN IS THIS WHOM EVEN WIND AND SEA OBEY?

e Gospel describes a nature miracle: Jesus calms a storm at sea. A nature miracle is a narrative in which the powerful hero transcends the laws of nature to perform some helpful action. It has a general structure: rst, danger of the elements, vv 37-38; second, the act of power, v 39; third, the response of wonder, vv 40-41.

While Jesus is peacefully asleep on a cushion, his disciples panic and wake him up, even with words of rebuke, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?” After Jesus has commanded the wind to be quiet and be still, they question Jesus’ identity: Who is he? Why do wind and sea obey him?

This story presents Jesus as one who has power over nature. For the Jews, the sea monster Leviathan has power over the sea. Mark tells his audience, however, that Jesus has overpowered the sea monster Leviathan.

The Gospel should strengthen our faith in Jesus.


 

Jesus calmed the stormy sea; he can also calm the storms in our life.

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